Leak Troubleshooting

Some quick things to check that are common issues:

  • A toilet that continues to run after flushing
  • Wet spots in your yard that may indicate your sprinkler system or the line to your house is leaking

You may wonder how the meter checks for leaks

Here is the logic that it uses to do that

“Leak Detection: Leak monitoring is constant. As a standard, the leak flag is triggered after 48 hours of continuous water movement. The leak flag will turn off if no water movement occurs for a period of 1 hour to ensure that the utility is not wasting resources addressing a leak that was in reality high usage.”

 

How to test for a leak

Your meter will be in a black plastic box most likely at the street in one corner of your property. Here’s a picture of what it looks like:

In most cases you’ll only see the top of the box. Most often, there is a box for you and for your neighbor close together. The box closest to your house should be yours. There is a cover on the box that can be pulled off. It can be a little hard to pull off, but don’t worry it won’t break anything by pulling off the cover. Maybe wear gloves in case there are unfriendly critters in the box. Not all the meters are exactly the same, but below is a sample picture of a meter. While doing the test make sure no one in your house is using water. If you see a number greater than zero in the flow rate (circled in red in the picture below) then you may have a leak somewhere. The higher the number the worse the leak is. You can determine if the leak is in the line between the meter and your house by shutting off the water at the main valve at your house. If the flow rate continues when the house valve is shut off there’s a leak in your underground line somewhere between the meter and your house. If it stops and then resumes when you open the valve at the house you have a leak in your house or in something connected to your house water supply.